Monday, October 6, 2008

Ring of Kerry

Before you start to look here I will highlight that in the Dingle area of Kerry there are 2000 archeology sites in the Dingle area alone in Kerry, so if I have left out some sites that I could not get too! This is Gallarus Oratory in the Dingle area of Kerry, this is the most westerly point in Europe. It is supposed to have been built as early as the 6th century or the 9th Century, there are some differences of opinion. the sloping design makes the building strong and keeps the inside dry. This is a cross that stands beside the oratory This is Leacanabuile Stone Fort near Caherciveen this was built in the 9th or 10th century and was the home of a rich farmer, the entrance is on the east side as it is on a hill and is open to the elements, the circular building in the middle is the house. The walls of the fort are 3 metres in thickness and there are steps up to guard fort and as a lookout. I made sure to get people in the pictures to give perspective of heights. This is Cahergall fort and is older again from the 5th century BC or the 4th century ad, it is hard to date. at This is Staigue fort and is further south on the ring near the village of Sneem, it is popular with tourist's as the Bus stops here on the ring of Kerry, but there are better examples in Dingle, but that is just of the Ring that the daily bus tours don't always get to. I was probably not impressed that you paid a contribution to the guy that owns the land for upkeep and there was animals in the fort and sh!t everywhere. From an archaeological point of view is supposed to be 2500 years old and is a good example of dry stone wall building of that era. These Beehive huts are on the Dingle peninsula these are difficult to date as corbel roofs have been in existence in Ireland since newgrange 3100BC and these huts have been used up to the 20th century as storage and for small animals such as sheep. This is the remains of Ballycarbery Castle it is just down the road from Leacanabuile fort This is the old British barracks in Caherciveen it is unusual with turrets but the story that it was built to a design supposed to be for India is probably false as this is a common myth in many of British built castles around Ireland.

4 comments:

findabair said...

Ooooh - beehive huts, circular stone forts and castles... There's a reason why I love Ireland!! Yup, definitely about time I get to Kerry :) As usual thanks for some wonderful photos!

Leisha Camden said...

This is maybe the most interesting post on your blog so far! Not that the others haven't been good of course. ;-) You don't know this about me but I have a Master's degree in medieval history ... for which I studied archaeology among other things. Fascinating post for me. :-)

Paz said...

Findabair, sorry thought I replied, yup you have to get your ass there, shame on you :P
Leisha, sorry I did not get more of the 2000 sites there in Kerry. But what about posting of Newgrange :O. There are up to 40 passage graves in Meath. Some older that Giza and Stonehenge! there are only 6 in Karmøy!!!(maybe the vikings stole the idea when the raped and pillaged over here) >:O

Leisha Camden said...

Yeah, the Vikings liked to steal a little bit of everything, so I wouldn't be surprised. ;-)